Etiquette in the Workplace - Landing the Job

So you’re ready to land that first job, or maybe move on to another opportunity. You’ve spent an enormous amount of time getting your resume or C.V. together, in the various forms they come in these days (remember back when it was on paper??), and you’ve finally been invited to interview. Now is when it’s time to shine and showcase your polish and confidence. That first impression is when you make your mark:

Mind Your Social Media Manners – Don’t think twice that potential employers won’t first look you up online to quickly weed out if they want to take your resume any further. In fact, for some larger organizations, their H.R. department may be tasked with doing just that. Your potential employer is looking for someone who will be an exemplary representation of that organization, and if your online presence turns up any photos or words that are questionable, you can probably consider yourself out of the running. There’s a lot of competition out there, and you have to set yourself apart in a positive way.

P.S. This goes for life in general. Your online image and presence sends many messages about you, intended or unintended. Keep it courteous, respectful, civil and dignified, and you’ll find it will help you keep relationships and flourish new ones.

Prepare for the Interview – You should be doing as much advance work as your potential employer is! Review their Web site in depth so you can answer questions and pose thoughtful, educated ones. And, if possible, look up the person with whom you are interviewing so you recognize their face when you meet in person and possibly know a little more about them to add to conversation.

Dress the Part – You’ve likely heard the expression, “Dress for the job you want.” Well, it still holds up. It is always better to be overdressed than underdressed, especially when you are trying to land the job. You may already know that the organization has somewhat of a “relaxed or business casual” environment, but that does not give you permission to assume that is okay for the interview. Most would never fault you for, say, a suit and tie, or a lady’s business suit or dress, even if it’s a casual workplace. But, they just may note you didn’t bother to change out of your jeans and tennis shoes. Always err on the side of looking your personal best.

Be on Time – Be on time, be on time, be on time. Cannot overstate this enough. Going into an interview with a strike for lateness puts you at a tremendous disadvantage, and can taint the overall tone of the interview. It’s discourteous to the person interviewing you, who likely has a full day already and is short on time. Not to mention, you lose out on that time you could have been using to impress. CONVERSELY, don’t arrive too early. Ten to 15 minutes early MAX is an ideal time to arrive. Arriving 30 minutes early or more puts the interviewer in a position to have to figure out what to do with you, especially if he or she is tied up until the interview time.

Make an Impression – When the moment arrives, and the interviewer walks toward you to greet you, follow these rules:

·      Stand Up

·      Extend your Hand and use their last name i.e. “It’s a pleasure to meet you Mr. Jones/Mrs.     Smith”

·      Shake Hands (2 or 3 firm pumps) and smile!

·      Say “Thank You” for taking the time for the interview. You will say this again at the end.

Follow Up – When the interview is over, say “thank you” once again as you are leaving. Always end with that message of gratitude. Then follow up, immediately, with a “thank you” note. It will likely distinguish you from the others. If you feel compelled, you may also send an immediate follow up “thank you” email for same day timeliness. But still put that written “thank you” note in the mail too as it shows an added touch of effort, which just may make the difference.

 

Now Go and Be Gracious! 

 

courtney logo.jpg